Is it time to eat yet?

A great multitude had gathered to hear Jesus, no doubt because they were hungry for the word of life.  Jesus’ disciples wanted to send them away at the end of the day because they did not have the resources to feed them.  They even complained how much money it would take to feed such a crowd — at least six month’s wages! Jesus took the little they had — five loaves and two fish — and giving thanks to his heavenly Father, distributed to all until they were satisfied of their hunger. The people of Israel had been waiting for the prophet whom Moses had promised: The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you, from your brethren — him shall you heed (Deuteronomy 18:15). The signs which Jesus did, including the miraculous feeding of the five thousand, signified that God has indeed sent him as anointed Prophet and King. Jesus’ feeding of the five thousand is the only miracle recorded in all four gospels. What is the significance of this miracle? The miraculous feeding of such a great multitude pointed to God’s provision of manna in the wilderness for the people of Israel under Moses’ leadership. This food foreshadowed the true heavenly bread which Jesus would offer his followers.

Jesus makes a claim only God can make: He is the true bread of heaven that can satisfy the deepest hunger we experience. The feeding of the five thousand shows the remarkable generosity of God and his great kindness towards us. When God gives, he gives abundantly. He gives more than we need for ourselves that we may have something to share with others, especially those who lack what they need. God takes the little we have and multiplies it for the good of others.

When John recounted the apostles being alone at sea in a storm he described the situation as “dark” (John 6:17).  It was dark not only physically but spiritually as well. Although they were experienced fishermen, they were fearful for their lives. The Lord’s sudden presence on the sea only made them more fearful!  John says they were frightened.  And Jesus had to calm them with a reassuring command: “Do not be afraid because I am here with you!” While the Lord may at times seem distant to us, he, nonetheless is constantly present.  The scriptures remind us that the Lord is “a very present help in trouble” (Psalm 46:1). Whatever storms make beset us, he promises to “bring us to our desired haven” (Psalm 107:29-30). The Lord keeps watch over us at all times, and especially in our moments of temptation and difficulty.  Do you rely on the Lord for his strength and help?  Jesus assures us that we have no need of fear if we trust in Him and in his great love for us.   When calamities or trials threaten to overwhelm you, how do you respond? With faith and hope in God’s love, care and presence with you?

What do you most hunger for – health, wealth, love, truth, life? Jesus addressed this issue with those who sought him after the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves. Were they simply hungry for things which satisfy the body or for that which satisfies the heart and soul? Jesus echoes the question posed by the prophet Isaiah: “Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread, and your labor for that which does not satisfy” (Isaiah 55:2)? There are two kinds of hunger — physical and spiritual. Only God can satisfy the spiritual hunger in our heart and soul — the hunger for truth, for life, and for love. Jesus also spoke about the works of God and what we must do to be doing the works of God, namely to believe in God’s Son whom he has sent into the world. Jesus offers a new relationship with God which issues in a new kind of life: A life of love and service, and the forgiveness of others which corresponds to God’s mercy and kindness; a life of holiness and purity which corresponds to God’s holiness; and a life of submission and trust which corresponds to the wisdom of God. This is the work which Jesus directs us to and enables us to perform in the power of the Holy Spirit.

The Jews were scandalized and the disciples were divided when Jesus said “unless you eat my flesh and drink my blood, you have no life in you.” What a hard saying, unless you understand who Jesus is and why he calls himself the bread of life. The miracle of the multiplication of the loaves (John 6:3-13), when Jesus said the blessing, broke and distributed the loaves through his disciples to feed the multitude, is a sign that prefigured the superabundance of the unique bread of the Eucharist, or Lord’s Supper. The Gospel of John has no account of the Last Supper meal (just the foot washing ceremony and Jesus’ farewell discourse). Instead, John quotes extensively from Jesus’ teaching on the bread of life.

In the Old Covenant bread and wine were offered in a thanksgiving sacrifice as a sign of grateful acknowledgment to the Creator as the giver and sustainer of life. Melchizedek, who was both a priest and king (Genesis 14:18; Hebrews 7:1-4), offered a sacrifice of bread and wine. His offering prefigured the offering made by Jesus, our high priest and king (Hebrews 7:26; 9:11; 10:12). The remembrance of the manna in the wilderness recalled to the people of Israel that they live – not by earthly bread alone – but by the bread of the Word of God (Deuteronomy 8:3). At the last supper when Jesus blessed the cup of wine, he gave it to his disciples saying, “Drink of it, all of you, for this is my blood of the covenant, poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins” (Matthew 26:28). Jesus was pointing to the sacrifice he was about to make on the cross, when he would shed his blood for us – thus pouring himself out and giving himself to us – as an atoning sacrifice for our sins and the sins of the world. His death on the cross fulfilled the sacrifice of the Passover lamb whose blood spared the Israelites from death in Egypt. Paul the Apostle tells us that “Christ, our paschal lamb, has been sacrificed” (1 Corinthians5:7). Paul echoes the words of John the Baptist who called Jesus the “Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world” (John 1:29). Jesus made himself an offering and sacrifice, a gift that was truly pleasing to the Father. He “offered himself without blemish to God” (Hebrews 9:14) and “gave himself as a sacrifice to God” (Ephesians 5:2).

Jesus chose the time of the Jewish Feast of Passover to fulfill what he had announced at Capernaum – giving his disciples his body and his blood as the true bread of heaven. Jesus’ passing over to his Father by his death and resurrection – the new Passover – is anticipated in the Last Supper and celebrated in the Eucharist or Lord’s Supper, which fulfills the Jewish Passover and anticipates the final Passover of the church in the glory of God’s kingdom. When the Lord Jesus commands his disciples to eat his flesh and drink his blood, he invites us to take his life into the very center of our being. That life which he offers is the very life of God himself.

Many were attracted to Jesus because he offered them something irresistible — God’s loving-kindness and mercy made manifest in his wonderful works of healing, deliverance, and miraculous feeding of the five thousand. Despite these signs, many stumbled, when Jesus made divine claims..  Jesus’ discourse on “eating his flesh and drinking his blood” (see John 6:51-59) which pointed to the Last Supper, caused offence to many of his followers. Jesus claimed to be the very life of God come down from heaven and that no one could live this life without submitting to him. Even the apostles admitted that this was a hard saying.  This expression meant that it was not just hard to understand, but hard to accept.  Jesus pressed the issue with his beloved disciples because he wanted to test their faith and loyalty. Jesus assures his disciples that it is his heavenly Father who invites and who gives the grace to follow even in the “hard sayings”.  Jesus knew that some would not only reject him and his word, but would do so with hostility, even betraying him to his enemies.

Real faith seeks understanding.  That is why God gives us the help of the Holy Spirit to enlighten the eyes of our mind to understand his truth and wisdom (Ephes. 1:17-18). Jesus offers his life-giving word and Spirit to those who believe and who submit to his authority.  Peter’s profession of loyalty was based on a personal relationship with Jesus.  Through the gift of faith Peter knew that Jesus was the Messiah, the Holy One of God, and he believed in his words. Faith is a response to God’s revelation. It’s the key to seeing God work in our lives with power.  Do you believe, as Peter did, that Jesus can change your life because he has the words of everlasting life?  Ask the Lord to increase your faith that you may grow in your relationship with him and in the knowledge of his love for you.

Read Day 5 Devotion by Cristy

 

Let us know your thoughts about today’s scripture reading. God speaks differently to each person through His Word. We can strengthen and encourage each other by sharing what God is teaching us.

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